Attorney Karl Heideck

Karl Heideck is a contract attorney in the Philadelphia area. He mainly practices in civil litigation, compliance and risk management. Heideck attended Swarthmore College where he received his Bachelors Degree in English language and literature in 2003. Later, he went to Temple University’s James E. Beasley School of Law, where he graduated with honors in 2009.

After he graduated, he began working at a professional practice. He received a lot of great experience while he worked around Philadelphia. He worked as a project attorney at Pepper Hamilton LLP and even had an associate position at Conrad O’Brien. Currently, Karl is working at Grant and Eisenhower PA as an attorney.

Karl specialized in litigation, which is an action brought in court to enforce a certain right. A big case Karl Heideck was involved in was the lawsuit by Philadelphia, represented by attorney’s at Grant and Eisenhower, against Wells Fargo. They decided to sue because the bank was violating the Fair Housing Act of 1968. They were alleged to be using predatory lending practices directed at minority mortgage borrowers. They specifically aimed their practice towards African American and Hispanic borrowers. They would offer them risky loans with high interest rates even though they did not have a credit score that qualifies. They denied the charges, but do not look too well in the public eye. Wells Fargo had a slightly tarnished reputation prior to these allegations. A year prior, they were accused of being involved in a scandal that dealt with bankers opening illegitimate bank accounts in their customers names. This accusation alone makes Wells Fargo a hard company to trust. Most people will not trust someone who comes from a place of business that tried to scam a former customer. Conclusively, Wells Fargo bank was accused of redlining. Redlining is an old practice that involves drawing red lines around neighborhoods they do not want to give loans to. These lines are usually drawn around neighborhoods that contain certain ethnicities and races. Redlining is not illegal if it is done and the neighborhoods do not meet other, more ethical standards. When doing this, Wells Fargo broke the constitution.

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